EU Athletes Statement on COVID-19 Impact on Sport

EU Athletes Statement on COVID-19 Impact on Sport

On 31st of March 2020, EU Athletes Executive Board held an online emergency meeting in order to discuss latest developments related to the Coronavirus pandemic and its impact on sport and the athletes. In the time of a global public health crisis, many of player associations and players themselves have demonstrated an exemplary leadership, dedication and solidarity related to this unprecedented situation.

EU Athletes and its members are committed to making sure that professional and elite level sport in Europe remains a viable and sustainable business in the long-term. During the discussion, Board members exchanged about the way that clubs, leagues and federations in different sports and countries are dealing with the current situation. It was agreed that in order to find adequate short and long-term solutions to various challenges facing sport sector, there is a need to prioritize dialogue and stakeholder engagement.

Today more than ever, athletes need to be a part of the solution. That is why we call for sport organizations to commit to the active engagement with the athlete and player associations about sport’s response to the current crisis.’ said Paulina Tomczyk, the General Secretary of EU Athletes. ‘This way it can be assured that the fundamental athletes’ rights are respected through a proper decision making process.’

Read the full statement here.

For any further inquiries: info@euathletes.org

Please follow and like us:
EU Athletes Statement on COVID-19 Impact on Sport

Statement on Bye-law 3 to Rule 40 of the Olympic Charter

Following the developments related to the modification of the Olympic Charter’s Bye-law 3 to Rule 40 (Rule 40) and inquiries about its incompatibility with the European Union (EU) law, we would like to underline our opposition to the above-mentioned rule, emphasize our support for the European Commission for protecting athletes’ rights against the abuse and express an openness to a dialogue and negotiations on this matter.

Athletes that we represent are among those that are obliged to comply with Rule 40 in order to compete at the Olympic Games. Following the German Bundeskartellamt ruling earlier this year, it is increasingly clear the Olympic Rule 40 is in breach of the EU competition law. Despite the recent changes, Rule 40 remains unduly restrictive of athletes’ economic rights and their commercial opportunities.

We are strongly of the opinion that Rule 40’s continued excessive restrictions are a result of the flawed decision-making process within the Olympic movement. Independent athlete associations, who do not support Rule 40, were excluded from the process. Mere consultation of athlete commissions, which are a part of the Olympic movement themselves, is unacceptable when it comes to rules that affect all athletes participating at the Olympic Games. By choosing to ignore independent athlete associations, the IOC’s approach is not compatible with the principles of good governance and the fundamental right of freedom of representation.

While the IOC indicates that the athletes should negotiate directly with their National Olympic Committees (NOCs), it is apparent to EU Athletes, and probably the European Commission, that it is Rule 40 itself that is under question as a source of infringement of athletes’ rights. IOC, as the leader of the Olympic Movement and organizer of the Olympic Games, must assure that the athletes’ rights are respected in this context. At the same time, the European Commission has a responsibility to help protect the economic rights of European athletes and is uniquely placed to do so by ensuring that sport organizations comply with EU competition law. It is unacceptable for sport organisations to abuse their dominant positions to pursue their own commercial interests to the detriment of the rights of athletes.

From our side, EU Athletes is committed to advancing the rights of the athletes in Europe and is committed to discussion and negotiation in order to reach a long-term solution that is compatible with the EU law and fundamental rights as well as the interests of the stakeholders.

Please follow and like us:
Constructive discussions about European volleyball at ACPV meeting

Constructive discussions about European volleyball at ACPV meeting

A meeting organized by the Association des Clubs Professionnels de Volleyball has taken place in Nova Gorica, Slovenia on 15th of November 2019. On the invitation of ACPV, Blagovest Petrov, a former volleyball player and the General Secretary of Spanish Volleyball Players Association (AJJV) was there to represent his organization as well as EU Athletes.

It was an opportunity to talk about the development of player associations in Europe as well as different projects and initiative we are supporting, particularly on dual career and player development. Furthermore, the current volleyball transfer policy and the issues it brings were discussed. We believe that dialogue between all stakeholders are necessary to modify and improve the system which is now in place. 

EU Athletes and its member associations representing volleyball players are looking forward to further cooperation with ACPV for the benefit of the athletes and the sport itself.

Please follow and like us:
European basketball players: #WeAreStrongerTogether

European basketball players: #WeAreStrongerTogether

Since January 2018, EU Athletes has been involved as a parnert  the EU-funded project ‘European Social Dialogue Targeted Initiative: Strenghtening social Dialogue in the Professional Basketball Sector’. The project, coordinated by UNI Europa, allowed the player unions representing basketball players to participate in a number of meetings and work together in oder to discuss current issues and challenges, share best practices and learn from each other. Importantly, newly established player associations could also benefit from the knowledge and advice from the more experienced ones.

As the final action of the project which concluded this fall, top level players from 5 player associations (Sporta-Belgium, SNB-France, GIBA-Italy, ABP-Spain, ZZK-Poland) participated in a video where they talked about the reasons to join and to support their unions. While the reasons can be different for everyone, the common message from athletes around the Europe remains: ‘We are stronger together’.

 

 

Please follow and like us:
EU Athletes releases its new Common Position Paper

EU Athletes releases its new Common Position Paper

EU Athletes, the European federation of independent athlete unions and associations from different sports, representing more than 25 000 individual athletes, has released the newest Common Position Paper developed and agreed by its members. A working group composed by EU Athletes members and supported by staff was created to submit a new Draft Common Position Paper that could be discussed and amended during the last General Assembly that took place in Lisbon in June 2018.

The new Common Position Paper aims to articulate European athletes’ voice on key topics such as athlete rights, good governance, economic dimension of sport, match-fixing, anti-doping, personal development and cooperation with other stakeholders. The new Common Position Paper takes into accounts recent developments and issues, formulating clear proposals and recommendations directed at European institutions, Member States and sport organizations.

For EU Athletes General Secretary Paulina Tomczyk, “EU Athletes is owned by its members and it essential for us that they got actively involved in the review of the Common Position Paper. Our goal is to improve the sport governance for the benefit of the players, but also the sport itself. In order to do so, we are looking forward to dialogue and cooperation with public and private stakeholders, to make sure that sport respects athletes’ fundamental rights as people, citizens and workers.”

You can download the document under the following link: EU Athletes 2018 Common Position Paper

Please follow and like us:
Maternity Rights and Minimum Wage for the Women’s WorldTour

Maternity Rights and Minimum Wage for the Women’s WorldTour

The Cyclists’ Alliance is pleased that the UCI has continued down a path of reform and improvement in women’s elite cycling, starting in 2020. New contract minimum standards, including maternity leave and a starting point for a Women’s WorldTour minimum salary, are important next steps in the evolution of our sport.

As reported in Cyclingnews.com by editor Kristen Frattini, the Alliance played an important part in both of these developments. First, Iris Slappendel was able to share suggested contract terms in the Alliance’s “model contract” with the UCI, in her role as a member of the Women’s WorldTour committee. (As the UCI does not yet recognize any women’s rider union, the model contract was shared only in her capacity as a committee member.)

Our model contract, which is available to our members to help you in your own contract negotiations, was drafted to contain many common protections available in other professional sports. Maternity leave is actually a critical protection for working women everywhere, but this is the first time women in cycling will have such a safety net.

As written by Frattini, Slappendel “advocated for maternity leave and insurance surrounding maternity. It’s been a big topic of discussion because there are people who find it difficult to understand, who feel that an athlete should not become pregnant because it is a cost to the team.” However, as women are having longer careers in the sport, and returning to race after having children, women’s cycling is overdue for maternity rights.

As we have shared before, you should not have to sacrifice your career for your family, and as our sport modernizes and listens to its riders, you may not have to. The other major announcement of a 15,000 EUR starting salary for WWT team riders is also encouraging. While the UCI has stated a target to eventually match the standard of Men’s Continental salaries (30,000 EUR), we will continue to lobby the UCI and work with all of the teams throughout our sport to find the right salary for the economics in women’s cycling.

We hope to eventually negotiate directly with any future association of our teams and create a Collective Bargaining Agreement for a minimum salary. In the meanwhile, only the WWT teams will be required to offer a minimum salary, which may create inequity in the sport in the short term. However, as women’s cycling gains popularity, we will continue to work with stakeholders to improve the economics and create better salary conditions for everyone, in all of our racing disciplines, for our teammates and professional staff alike.

The original article from EU Athletes member, the Cyclists Alliance can be found here.

Please follow and like us: